2 November 2017

Hindsight

I am going out for more walking, exploration and photo-snapping in Derbyshire today but before putting my key in Clint's ignition, I thought I would share some more pictures with you. They were taken last Friday - the same day that I visited Alsop-en-le-Dale with its much-loved little church. It was a beautiful day.

Here's moss growing on a limestone wall near Tissington:- 
Here's the farmhouse of Manor Farm in Alsop-en-le-Dale:-
Here's a view of Johnson's Knoll south of Biggin:-
Here's a cow calmly observing me from a field north of Parwich:-
Here's the triangulation pillar on Aleck Low. It was erected here in the 1920's in relation to the Ordnance Survey's drive to map our country ever more accurately. The pillars are now largely redundant because modern technology has overtaken old-fashioned triangulation. Just behind the pillar, the raised ground is the site of a 4000 year old burial mound.
On my way home, I stopped to take this picture of the little mere in the village of Monyash:-
Soon it will be time to drive out there again. Perhaps I will gather more pictures to share with you. Cheerio!

27 comments:

  1. What time is it in Yorkshire? You must be posting in the middle of the night!

    As usual, all if your photos are gorgeous.

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    1. You are like a detective Jennifer! Cagney or Lacey? I sometimes post after midnight before going to bed.

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  2. The sheep and the cow are the Kardashians of the animal world...they appear to thoroughly enjoy being photographed!

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    1. Their backsides are not big enough to be Kardashian backsides. They are also much more intelligent.

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  3. Those photos make me happy now that I will be returning to the UK at the weekend.

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    1. England is your homeland. She has been waiting for your return.

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  4. These are all beautiful! I have not yet decided whether to make another photo calendar for 2018, but if I do, I may nick something from here - with your permission only, of course.

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    1. With my complete blessing, you are welcome to utilise any of my pictures Meike.

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  5. Breathtakingly beautiful. It could be because I have a savage chest infection but beautiful, never the less!

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    1. Have you got a savage chest infection because you are a savage Christina? I hope you are feeling better soon.

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    2. Haha. Maybe.
      I'm 5 weeks and 3 courses of antibiotics in, so far. Think I can see light at the end of the tunnel or maybe it's a guy with a torch bringing more bugs!
      Lovely pictures. I really enjoyed them , not being able to get out much at the moment. Thank you.

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  6. I always love your countryside photos, they always have a simple naturalness about them.

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    1. That's a nice thing to say Derek. Thank you.

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  7. Beautiful pictures, Mr. P. Reminds me, by the way, that your loyal friends here have not seen Bo and Peep for a while. Do they still dwell in your neighborhood? Ta, ta.

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    1. Bo and Peep are still happily munching the grass in our garden ma'am. I shall inform them you have been asking after them.

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  8. Is a "mere" a pond? I don't know that word. I love that mossy wall and the knoll with the sheep!

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    1. That mere is called Fere Mere. Possibly it is a mere rather than a pond because it is a natural phenomenon. Unusually for a limestone area there is a layer of clay that traps the mere water. I grew up close to a much bigger mere in East Yorkshire - Hornsea Mere.

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    2. The Oxford dictionary says "mere" is British for lake or pond. That's a new word for me, as well.

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  9. Lovely pics YP. You certainly meet up with a lot of cows on your travels !

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    1. If I was a misogynist I might say that I also meet up with a lot of cows at the local pub!

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    2. Mr YP! And you an ex-teacher.

      If I *were*...

      Good photos, though!

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    3. Thank you for spotting my deliberate error Creaking Oldie! And thanks for calling by.

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  10. That mossy wall is beautiful. Everything is still so green there. Is that a happy effect of having lots of rain?

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    1. My part of England is never as wet as some people imagine but of course most plants need water to thrive.

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  11. Ah so lovely. I miss being able to ramble around the English countryside so much. I like the cow, she's very pretty. As are all cows, one of my favourite animals.

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    1. They seem so calm. Happy with their simple lives. We could learn a lot from cows.

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  12. I missed this interesting post!

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Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.