1 August 2017

Remembered

Passchendaele

We see you from a hundred years away
And even from this distance
Still hear the echoes
Of your lost goodbyes
With
Water brimming in our eyes.
We see you in our minds
Yet though we try
Cannot discern your horrors
Or hear those awful sounds
Or say why
We carved your names in stone
- Those that were known.

14 comments:

  1. Tears brim and overflow too frequently...

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    Replies
    1. More than 60,000 Australians gave their lives in WWI. 156000 were wounded.

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  2. Such horror...and for what? will we ever learn?.

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    1. In history many soldiers have given their lives for just and understandable causes but in World War I there seemed to be no reason. That factor increases the grief.

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  3. We must all remember to remember lest the future generations FORGET.

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    1. The stupidity of WWI acts like a warning beacon and perhaps that is why its story remains fresh and meaningful.

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  4. I got well peed off last night watching the ceremonies in Belgium, ceremonies to honour the bravery of the people that you mention above, to see that pratt Prince Charles wearing a line of medals on his jacket. They certainly weren't for any acts that could compete with those WW1 soldiers, just for briefly being in the Royal Navy. I'd of been too embarrassed to wear them at that particular event if I'd of been him.

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    1. I thought the ceremony was marvellous but I agree with what you say about royals wearing medals.

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  5. My grandfather fought at Passchendaele and lost an eye and had shrapnel in his leg, which was to affect him the rest of his life, though fortunately - unlike many - he had a life. His horse (he was in the Royal Artillery and the horse pulled the gun carriages) was killed at the same time. Something I recall him speaking about when I was a child. Have been thinking of him lots this last few days.

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    1. Both my grandfathers came home from The Somme. They didn't die but what they had experienced affected every day of their future lives. I guess it was the same for your grandfather.

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  6. A very moving poem, and speaks the truth.

    Did you want to join Poetry Monday, by the way? Or do you prefer to not be tied to the schedule? You can always just leave a link to your blog on my Monday posts; it doesn't matter if your poem follows the suggested theme or not. I can put a link for this poem if you like.

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    1. I am happy for you to make the link Jenny. Thank you. But I don't wish to be tied down... unless you have a bullwhip and leather thigh boots!

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    2. Done! And wash your mouth out, sir!

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  7. Hyphenation: re‧mem‧bered. Verb[edit]. remembered. simple past tense and past participle of remember. Retrieved from ...
    ตารางคะแนนบุนเดสลีกา

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Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.