14 April 2017

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Bullocks at Llynon near our lovely gatehouse with Llynon Mill on the ridge
If you are fed up of hearing about Anglesey, I am pleased to inform you that references to it will now fall into sharp decline as we are back in the land of the righteous - Yorkshire. We drove home via The North Wales Expressway, zooming seamlessly along the M56 to the M60 which is the Manchester Ring Road.

We were making good time but then we got to the end of the M67 near Hyde and it was as if we had suddenly joined a funeral procession. Like all Sheffield folk travelling from the Manchester area we are used to it. Crawling along to the roundabout and then crawling up the hill to Mottram-in-Longendale. Then yet more snail-like progress through Glossop. Aaargh! 
The Swellies - in the Menai Strait
Eventually - back home with lovely memories of  Anglesey. We were very lucky with the weather. If we had had a grey week we would have probably returned thinking - what a grim place!
Bryn Celli Ddu - yesterday morning
Yesterday morning we travelled to the east of the island specially to see another ancient burial mound - Bryn Celli Ddu (mound in the dark grove). Bizarrely when we got there there was an American TV crew making a documentary and in the adjacent field - from Manchester Metropolitan University -some students were undertaking an archaeological survey. A few minutes later a small nursery school party arrived in day-glo jerkins. It wasn't the peaceful examination we expected but it was still a special place to be.

Then we drove up to Beaumaris and back to Menai Bridge for lunch in a little cafe. This was the holiday on which I discovered  a delightful sandwich combination - brie, cranberry and bacon. I just wonder why I never tried it before.
Offerings to The Ancients inside the passage tomb. I left a business
card from The Serene Guesthouse in Bangkok Thailand.

15 comments:

  1. So that's where my shells went.

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  2. Those bullocks look like they are ready to come investigate you, and not in a good way.

    Beautiful scenery once again. I check out the Swellies online and it seems a beautiful through treacherous area for sailors.

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    1. The Menai Strait is notoriously difficult and dangerous for any boats to navigate. I love the name "The Swellies".

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  3. So glad you have enjoyed the break YP

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    1. Thanks for following our trip Mrs Weaver.

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  4. The Swellies? Please explain - I much prefer learning it from your blog than from wikipedia or elsewhere.
    If you come over to my blog you'll find that I have kept my promise about Fred's portrait.

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    1. In The Menai Strait tides collide and the waters can be treacherous. They swirl ominously and I guess they also swell. "The Swellies" is a local name for the waters at this point. The little inhabited island in the middle of the channel was a fishing point - cleverly trapping fish as the tides turned.

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  5. I don't know whether I'd like to live on or in the Swellies as it looks like you could get very wet. We have great roads but they are still too choked with cars. Somehow we have to find a way to cut down on the number of cars we drive.

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    1. You and The MM could avoid using your car by living in the middle of The Swellies.

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  6. Yorkie! Yorkie! You reprimand me, when 'tis I who should be reprimanding you! As if I would eat Cling!!! Ye of little faith...I'm hurt! :)

    Read my response to you on my blog and you will see the error of your ways and belief!!

    Welcome home! :)

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    1. What the hell is Cling? Something very sticky I presume.

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    2. I think you understand my typo, Yorkie! I know I'm probably the only one who ever makes them! :)

      I have clung on to Clint!

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  7. Glad you're home safely, and hopefully without anymore scary driving incidents! The burial mound is interesting. At least it's being visited rather than ignored -- the fact that so many people are interested in its history seems heartening!

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    1. You are probably right but we wanted it to ourselves. I guess I'm greedy that way.

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