20 April 2017

Foreshore

I'm starting to think about painting landscapes. See the photograph above. I took it from the northern shore of The Humber near Hessle Haven. Beyond the old jetty you can see The Humber Bridge arching gracefully across the river. It was opened in 1981 and at that time was the longest suspension bridge in the world. It remains an iconic structure linking Yorkshire with northern Lincolnshire. 

I have travelled across it many times but when I was a schoolboy in Hull, the only way we could get across that mile-wide river was by steam ferry. Lincolnshire was a faraway world like Narnia, inhabited by strange folk known as Yellowbellies. Little did I know back then that I would end up marrying a Yellowbelly!

Below I have used picture effects in "Word" to create a new version of the picture in which only a handful of shades have been used in what is called a "cutout" style. I think it is handy to have a look at the picture this way because it helps to overlook superfluous details and get right to the heart of the picture's basic structure and the different layers of light and shade.
Perhaps I should have checked out this version before my first attempt at the composition. I am not happy with what emerged. Sometimes I can be far too timid with my use of colour and I know that I need  to force myself to be bolder. Anyway, this was my first attempt:-

28 comments:

  1. Always good to challenge yourself, YP. Another suggestion is to reproduce the reference photo in black and white - this puts the emphasis only on values, and eliminates color as a factor in decision-making. Have fun!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Professor Mary. You are my online tutor.

      Delete
  2. You really have talent, YP. I imagine that you'll paint beautiful landscapes, judging by how nice your photographs of them always turn out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We will see how this one goes Jennifer. I will try my best.

      Delete
  3. Oh yes - I remember those days well. This comes of course from a yellowbelly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Why you Lincolnshire folk are called Yellowbellies remains uncertain. My wife's belly is banana-coloured.

      Delete
  4. Foreshore and sheven years ago, our 4 fathers (and you thought there were only 2) brought forth (British, fourth) on this incontinent -- well, just use your imagination.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a little known fact that the occupants of "The Mayflower" had not passed the Plymouth Lunatic Asylum entrance exam - hence their banishment.

      Delete
  5. You have nice drawing skills, when you figure out your color sense, it will be exciting. Here's the web site of a young lady who is all about color and design. http://www.allison-curtis.com/ Your style is more conservative, but I always find Allison's use of color very inspiring. Keep it up!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the link Jan and thanks for dropping by again.

      Delete
  6. I don't know art, I only know what I like, and I like it.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Good first try YP.
    The lack of strong colour in the original photograph would make it an ideal subject for pen, ink and wash.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think you are right CG. There's a lot of interesting light but very little colour.

      Delete
  8. And an excellent first attempt it is. Surely you won't make it your last.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will not be Mistress George.

      Delete
  9. As always you are able to come up with something that has great possibilities!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You must have been a very encouraging teacher Red. Thanks.

      Delete
  10. That is a fantastic photograph, and your recreation came out quite well. I can't paint or draw, or do anything artistic. My daughter is a much better artist than I am, as are you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Chris. Nice to have you dropping by once more. Want a cup of tea? Sugar?

      Delete
  11. Educate me: why can't you just add colour on your painting? why do you need to do it again?

    It's a terrific image, very moody

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh no no no no no Kylie! Adding paint after the painting has dried and been remove from its board is against the rules of artistry! I would rather try again.

      Delete
  12. Looking at only your painting, without comparing it to the photograph, it comes to life on its own, with its very own mood. Only in comparison with the photo does it feel as if something is missing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for that observation. I have to keep reminding myself that creating art is not like photocopying the image you see before you.

      Delete
  13. You have a very precise and considered style Mr Pudding, with very effective results. How about going a bit wild with the paintbrush?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I want to go wild Sue but somehow it doesn't appear to be in my nature.

      Delete
  14. I think that first attempt is pretty good -- certainly better than what I could do. The hard part will be depicting those beautiful sun rays!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well spotted Steve. Those sunrays are definitely there but slightly elusive. I don't know if I can make them happen in the painting unless I go wild like Sue said.

      Delete

Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.