5 December 2016

Pictures

It's nice to share photographs with blog visitors. Some of you have  occasionally written complimentary comments about them. Such words are much appreciated. Sharing pictures is more motivational than saving them for my eyes only. If nobody else saw them, what would be the point?

Here are three more pictures, taken in the last three days. Below you can see an ancient squeeze stile I came across when walking between two farms in north east Derbyshire. The squeeze stile remains when the hedge or stone wall in which it once sat disappeared. long ago. The squeeze stile allowed people to squeeze through to the next field but not livestock.
From Ringinglow on Friday afternoon, I looked across the valley of The River Porter to the old tower of Lodge Moor Hospital as a rainbow fell on Harrison Lane. The hospital was demolished years ago and now an up-market housing estate surrounds the tower. Soon after this my camera battery flashed its exhaustion. It was a pity because soon afterwards the rainbow sharpened its colours and formed an impressive arc, framing our city down in the valley.
I took this next picture at The Great Pond of Stubbing where, as you can see, there's a little stone boat house. No boats are moored within it these days. I imagine long ago Edwardian summer days when little groups from the big house at Stubbing Court would saunter down to spend a pleasant hour or two boating on the pond with a wickerwork picnic hamper and a bamboo fishing rod. Not Stubbing Pond or Stubbing Lake but The Great Pond of Stubbing - maybe a good title for a new murder mystery.

33 comments:

  1. I like the notion of boating on the pond. I used to have a wonderful wicker picnic basket but nowadays it seems that picnics have to be accompanied by a giant, wheeled Eski cool box that can accommodate large quantities of beer. Not romantic at all. (P.S. Thank you for sharing your photos.)

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    1. I have hears of these Australian "Eski" boxes before. They should be called "Inuit" boxes. Thanks for calling by once again Sue.

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  2. A squeeze stile - I didn't know they existed. An apt name. Sharing photos is wonderful, it allows people to see places they would never otherwise see.

    Alphie

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    1. I know that people from overseas may be particularly unfamiliar with the details of the landscape of northern England so yes, it's nice to share.

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  3. There's nothing like a good walk to give lot of photo opportunities. I agree that photos should be looked at Here. I'm the only one who looks at photos.

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    1. As a computer nerd, I have discovered that The Micro Manager's favourite internet site is CanadianHunks.com which contains plenty of pictures!

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  4. I have many small dreams in my life,most will come true for me,but I have on big dream, traveling through England,a dream that will not come true. But your photos, though make me feel a bit sad also bring a lot of pleasure,joy if you will. You have such a good eye and I thank you for sharing your love of country and your talent with the camera.I feel very lucky to have found your blog. I'm even beginning to rediscover my enjoyment for poetry again. Thank you.

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    1. I am uplifted by this lovely comment. Thank you Wenda.

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  5. Brace yourself! Ready?

    Another array of stunning shots...thanks for sharing. :)

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    1. I braced myself expecting Hurricane Lee to strike my palm-fringed shores and what I got was a wafting summer breeze. Thank you.

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  6. My goodness, they must have been very slim in those days, to squeeze through that style ! Wonder how many could get through today - did you try?
    As always, thank you for the beautiful photos YP.

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  7. Ooops I meant stile.

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    1. Well-spotted CG. I rather think that that particular squeeze stile had squeezed itself when the boundary hedge or wall was removed.

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  8. My everyday life would be a little poorer without the possibility to look at the great pictures of beautiful Yorkshire (and elsewhere) scenery, Neil!
    I am glad you share your photos with us.

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    1. I know you have enjoyed plenty of my pictures Meike and I thank you very much for your support.

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  9. Thin people only in Yorkshire then! (Or climb over the fence/hedge/wall.)Lovely photos again.

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    1. This was in Derbyshire Frances. Derbyshire folk are flat like playing cards.

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  10. Do you research your walks before your go? how do you get all your information? Lovely pics again YP.

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    1. I work out a circular route and print off the map. Back home I may often use the good ol' internet to discover related stuff I didn't know but I already knew what a squeeze stile was. I have squeezed through plenty of the things.

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  11. I will start again YP - spelling mistake!
    I see that there is an open space next to that squeeze stile. Dare I venture to say "luckily for you"?

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    1. Madam! What pray dost thou imply with thy impish good humour?

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  12. The problem with being a late commenter is that it's hard to come up with something original :)

    It's all very pretty

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    1. Mostly, if I am commenting on another blogger's post, I don't read other comments. Is "pretty" a complimentary word Kylie?

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  13. As you know I'm a great fan of your wonderful countryside and your photos are always terrific. We are very happy about the way the currency exchange is going and hope to be back walking the fields ourselves soon...perhaps next year!

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    1. We are not so happy about the currency exchange situation following The Damned Brexit... And given recent trips I thought that you and Tony were turning into Francophiles!

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  14. This green and pleasant land! I never see an Edwardian boathouse that I don't think about E.M. Forster's novel "Maurice." The boathouse was where Maurice would secretly meet up with Alec...

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    1. I am unfamiliar with that novel. Up North boat houses are generally for storing boats and boating equipment, not for monkey business.

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  15. The squeeze stile reminds me of my childhood. I can't recall seeing one for many years. The boatshed reminds me of Buttermere. Lovely photos and lovely memories.

    PS Are we going to learn what happened to Lady Pudding at the weekend?

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    1. Lady Pudding went to Edinburgh at the weekend. What happens in Edinburgh stays in Edinburgh Graham. The Strictly final trip is on Dec 17th.

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    2. Oh what a silly billy I am.

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  16. Do you save your photos on the computer or do you select favorites to print out for photo books? Must be hard to select favorites so many great ones!

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    1. Thank you for reminding me about photo books Jan. I must make two or three more of them. They are a great new way of capturing pictures that would otherwise remain hidden in the bowels of one's computer.

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Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.